‘Inside Job’ reviewed by Gordon the Optom

by February 26, 2016

‘Inside Job’, is a complex but easy to follow, crime story. It was written in 1993 by Croydon-born, Brian Clemens OBE, the absolute master of crime. Brian, who looked like UK Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, died a year ago, aged 84. He was still writing at the age of 80.

Clemens developed timeless, TV classic series such as ‘The Avengers’ and ‘The Professionals’, he worked on ‘Bergerac’, ‘Danger Man’, ‘Adam Adamant’ and even ‘Perry Mason’. He was so prolific that he had to use a pseudonym, Tony O’Grady.

The Melville Theatre Company are presenting this cleverly written thriller at the Melville Theatre on the corner of Stock Road and Canning Highway, in Melville,

The curtain rises on this gripping, two hour play at 8.00 pm every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night until 5th March. There is a Sunday matinee on 28th February at 2.00 pm.

 

The scene is an upmarket, rented holiday villa on one of the Spanish Islands. It is a wonderfully designed (Joan Scafe) and eye-catching set, with the typical Spanish white walls, quality furnishings and bright coloured accessories. The superior set was built by Peter Bloor and Ross Bertinshaw.

The Bio Box operator was Susan Lynch, who had several lighting changes and special effects (aided by Stage Manger Vanessa Jensen) to deal with. Visually a stunning set.

 

     Whilst on holiday in Spain, Suzy (Kirstie Francis) – who has an abusive husband – sees a handsome man chatting up a bunch of holiday girls. A few months later whilst in Marbella, she sees the same man. On asking the locals, she finds that this chap, Larry (Max Maxville) is probably a professional safe-cracker on the run from the UK police.

     Kirstie decides to ask Larry back to her villa whilst her diamond dealing husband, Alex (Wayne Cant) is out on business. Larry thinks it yet another holiday romance, but glamourous Suzy has something quite different to propose.

 

Joan Scafe is a well-respected director, often going for the quirky and challenging scripts. For this three-hander, she has chosen a magnificent cast. Kirstie and Max have proven their talents many times, but Joan has selected complete newcomer, Wayne Cant for a major part. Wayne hasn’t even swept a stage before, let alone having a huge, complex and challenging part, but all three actors have fully rewarded Joan’s faith in them. They gave a perfectly paced performance, and certainly built up the suspense and terror. Great acting with clear enunciation.

This really is one of those plays that ticks all of the boxes, from the set, teching, script, acting and direction. Pure quality.