‘No Words Necessary’ reviewed by Gordon the Optom

by February 6, 2018

‘No Words Necessary’ is a World Premiere from the WA playwrights, Anna Lindstedt and Sally Davies. This adult production has a Kleenheat Sizzle Factor of Mild.

This innovative 50-minute show can be seen at the New Hayman Theatre, within the Curtin Theatre Arts at Building 302. Enter Curtin University from Manning Road, past CSIRO; turn right onto Brand Road – the ring road – and park in the last section of Car Park 9. There are signposts to the venue on the pathway opposite the car park.

This Lindstedt and Davies production can be seen at 6.30 on Saturday and Monday evenings, at 8.30 on Wednesdays and on the final evening, Saturday 17th February.

 

The set is a one-room bedsit. The man sleeps on a mattress on the floor. On the rear wall was sink unit. To the side an old music system. Centre stage a table and chairs. Hanging against the black walls was a white window frame.

Stephen Carr supervised the installation of his lighting design. Three Curtin Theatre students – one each night – will operate the sound and lighting equipment. The operators are Calum Christie, Sarah Connolly, and Kieran Trembath.

 

         A fierce storm is raging. A strange hermit-like man, known locally as ‘the weatherman’ cowers in his bed petrified of the storm. He spends most of his day doing the latest newspaper crossword. Occasionally, Sue, a young neighbour arrives holding an umbrella; she taps on the window to ask for help with her crossword.

       Despite the never-ending inclement weather, the very nervous and shy man never speaks or asks her into his home. He prefers to mime to her.

       It is obvious that the lonely man has few social skills, but could it be that he has another love?

     What is the secret he has hidden in the bookcase? Could it be some sort of sinister trophy?

 

Anna Lindstedt and Sally Davies are both Curtin acting graduates who have gone on to devise, direct and write stories such as this. This beautifully written script has humour and sadness, but the skilful structure takes the storyline to a new plain. I use the word ‘script’, but no words are spoken, and yet the actors sensitively convey a huge amount of emotion. It is difficult for a playwright to create sentiment and pity in such a short piece – but they have succeeded wonderfully. You could feel the depth of this poor man’s loneliness in his world without love.

Superbly acted and presented.